Book Review: Daughter of the Pirate King

Daughter of the Pirate KingTitle: Daughter of the Pirate King

Author: Tricia Levenseller

Pub. Date: February 28, 2017

Rating: ♥♥♥♥♥


There will be plenty of time for me to beat him soundly once I’ve gotten what I came for.

Sent on a mission to retrieve an ancient hidden map—the key to a legendary treasure trove—seventeen-year-old pirate captain Alosa deliberately allows herself to be captured by her enemies, giving her the perfect opportunity to search their ship.

More than a match for the ruthless pirate crew, Alosa has only one thing standing between her and the map: her captor, the unexpectedly clever and unfairly attractive first mate, Riden. But not to worry, for Alosa has a few tricks up her sleeve, and no lone pirate can stop the Daughter of the Pirate King.


This review will be completely spoiler free.

I listened this via Audible, and if you haven’t yet read this book, then check out the audio version – it was amazing, and I thoroughly enjoyed the narrator.

With that being said, Daughter of the Pirate King follows Pirate Princess Alosa and her mission to find ancient hidden map that would take her and her father to a hidden isle. Allowing herself to be purposefully captured by her enemies, she takes her time in captivity to search the ship.

Her job would be significantly easier if it weren’t for the first mate Riden, who is clever and very attractive – and there is instantly a kind of bond between the two of them. But Alosa is clever as well, and has a few tricks up her sleeve, and no pirate – no matter how attractive or smart can stop her.

I absolutely LOVED this book. I had heard a lot of hype surrounding the first novel, and I am so happy that it lived up to the hype. I finished the first one, and immediately wanted the second one – which I ordered off Amazon as soon as I got home from work. I loved the banter and relationship between Alosa and Riden – how there was mutual respect, and a lot of snark. I thought they complimented each other very well, and the attraction was on point.

Alosa, daughter of the Pirate King, views herself as untouchable and easily as smart if not smarter than everyone around her. I loved her confidence in who she was, but at the same time she had vulnerable moments. She was far from a perfect person, she had her good qualities as well as her flaws, but that made her feel more relatable. I liked that she felt modern without feeling out of place. She knew her worth, her power, and didn’t question her abilities to get shit done. She didn’t have to rely on certain special abilities to get most men to see her worth, and that some of them * cough* Riden * cough * preferred who she was naturally.

Riden. What can I say about Riden except I love him. I often find that when there are two MC’s in a novel, I end up liking one more than the other, but with this book, I loved them both. The only other book I can think of that gave me the same feeling is Kerri Mansicalco’s Stalking Jack the Ripper and Hunting Prince Dracula. In both of these series, I think that the main characters are so complimentary and just work together so nicely that there isn’t any room for me to feel discord with either or feel favoritism for one over the other. The witty, snarky, smart ass dialogue helped.

Their slow-burn, enemies-to-lovers relationship made me heart very happy. I can’t think of a single bad thing to say about this book – I loved it that much. Oh wait – there is one thing – it gave me SUCH A HUGE BOOK HANGOVER. As did Daughter of the Siren Queen (that review will be up soon).

Pirates should be more popular in YA and I would read the crap out of them! I do wish that there were more books in this series, because I could read about Alosa and Riden all day. I need more.  This is definitely a book that I would pick up to reread I loved it that much!

If you haven’t read this one yet, I definitely recommend it! What more could you want? Smart ass, clever pirates with romance and action – it’s a perfect combination!

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